Centura College

Connecting Communities & Careers

Job Seekers: “X” Marks the Spot at Centura Chesapeake’s May Career Fair

Posted by on Apr 26, 2017 in Adult Education, Career Fair, Centura Chesapeake, Centura College

Centura Chesapeake will be holding a career fair for its students, graduates, as well as individuals in the community who are seeking employment.

Millie and Megan welcome students at Centura Chesapeake’s Career Fair.

By Brian Stauss

Centura College will be holding a career fair on Thursday, May 17 at its campus located at 932 Ventures Way, Chesapeake, VA. The fair begins at 10 a.m. and will run until 12 noon.

The event will feature a wide range of companies from the healthcare industry, as well as companies not related to healthcare.  Employers attending will lend guidance regarding the application process for their companies, and may even hold on-site interviews for qualified applicants. Guests are expected to attend the career fair professionally dressed, with copies of their resumes and prepared to network. A list of participating employers can be found at https://www.facebook.com/events/286134321829702/.

“Centura College strives to connect communities and careers, so we are encouraging both our students, and the public to attend,” says Ashley West, Campus Executive Director at Centura College’s Chesapeake campus. “We will have many employers on-site, hiring for a variety of entry level and managerial positions.”

Career fair attendees are also invited to take a tour of the campus’s training facilities and to meet with admissions staff about the benefits of career-focused training and the various program options available at Centura College.  The campus will also be offering complementary vital checks, glucose testing and wellness evaluations.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information regarding Centura College’s career fair, contact the Chesapeake campus at (757) 549-2121.

About Centura College

Centura College has been part of an organization dedicated to helping men and women develop careers since 1969. By training working adults in healthcare, technology, business, legal studies and trades, they connect communities with some of the fastest growing career fields in today’s marketplace. The school offers professional facilities, knowledgeable instructors, day or evening classes, job placement assistance and is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC). To learn more, visit www.CenturaCollege.edu or like them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/centura.edu.

Autism: What is “The Spectrum?”

Posted by on Apr 25, 2017 in Adult Education, Centura College, Health, Lifestyle

Autism: What is “The Spectrum?”

By Esperanza Poquiz & Jul DeGeus

What is Autism?

                Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a brain disorder commonly characterized by having difficulty with communication and forming relationships, alongside having repetitive behaviors and obsessive interests. Symptoms are almost always present before the age of three and one in every 68 children are known to have some form of ASD. This results in more than 200,000 cases of ASD in the United States each year. (1) In honor of World Autism Awareness Month, here is some insight into Autism and ways you can help support research and spread awareness.

Signs and Symptoms

Autism spectrum disorder behaviors are typically present in early childhood. Parents may notice that their child is unresponsive when their name is called, or that there is a delay in learning to talk. Other signs caught in the early stages are a low interest in people, playing alone, and little to no eye contact. (2) Below are a few more signs that may develop:

  • Repetitive or unusual behaviors, i.e. rocking, repeating sounds, jumping
  • Difficulty in handling sensory stimuli ( touch smell, sight, sounds), may find it painful or confusing
  • Responding in an uncommon way when faced with emotions
  • Becoming distressed when placed in an over stimulating environment or when their routine has a minor change
  • Difficulties engaging in conversations
  • Having a tendency in eating non-food items, known as Pica

Behaviors and their severity vary with each person. Recognizing and tracking these signs can help you and your physician determine which treatment is best for you or your loved one.

Screening for ASD

                As recommended by The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), children should have a specific ASD screening done at their 18 and 24 month checkups. If the child has a sibling or other family members with autism, are premature with low birth weight, or show ASD behaviors earlier than 18 months an earlier screening may be needed. A child will be referred to additional evaluation if developmental problems are found during the screening.3 In some cases ASD characteristics may not be noticed until adult hood. Adults with ASD signs should speak with a doctor and ask to be referred for ASD evaluation or to a psychologist or psychiatrist with expertise in ASD.

Treatments and Therapies

Being that there is a vast range of symptoms associated with ASD, there are no standards in treatments. If you or your loved one has ASD, working with a health care professional is essential to develop a health care plan tailored specifically to your needs. If treatment starts early, most children can learn how to relate and communicate better with others. (3) Here are a few common treatments:

  • Medication – Taking medication can lead to having fewer problems with aggression, anxiety, depression, irritability, and repetitive behaviors.
  • Behavioral Training – This uses positive reinforcement by rewarding appropriate behavior which teaches social skills and helps with communication.
  • Therapy – Speech therapy, physical therapy, and psychotherapy can help those with ASD.

 

How You Can Help

                Awareness and education amongst family members and friends can lead to a less stressful environment when it comes to caring for someone with autism. By being trained, family members can learn the routine of the child and learn how to handle certain situations and reactions that the child may go through. Support groups or autism organizations are great ways to connect with people. By joining a support group you are able to trade information and experiences that may help you learn new options. (2)

There are many ways that those who are not directly affected by ASD can support the cause. Multiple organizations, such as Autism Society, Autism Speaks or Autism Cares Foundation, allow you to donate or fundraise for ASD. Search for local events, such as races, concerts, dinners or festivals, that are being held to raise money for ASD. Every little bit helps, whether you attend or volunteer to work these events. Fashionista? Some clothing and jewelry lines donate portions of their sales to ASD research and even have exclusive items created to showcase ASD awareness. If you are a bookworm, there is a long list of books to expand your knowledge of ASD. Any way you choose to help will benefit the spread of ASD awareness.

Caring for someone who has ASD can be hard at times, but by having the proper knowledge, support, and training, life for your loved ones can go a little smoother. If you want to know more about autism and how you/a loved one can get treated, consult your personal physician. If you would like more information or want to connect with others, call the Autism Response Team (ART) at 888-288-4762.

 

Sources:

  1. Autism Speaks. What is Autism. Retrieved April 14, 2017, from https://www.autismspeaks.org/section/what-autism
  2. National Institute of Mental Health. Autism Spectrum Disorder. Retrieved April 14, 2017, from  https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/autism-spectrum-disorders-asd/index.shtml
  3. Autism Spectrum Disorders Health Center. Retrieved April 14, 2017, from  http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/default.htm

Go With The Phle[botomy]

Posted by on Apr 18, 2017 in Adult Education, Centura College, Health, Phlebotomy

Go With The Phle[botomy]

By Jul DeGeus

What is Phlebotomy?

Phlebotomy is “the drawing of blood (as by venipuncture ) for transfusion, apheresis, diagnostic testing, or experimental procedures.” (1) What was once used as the go-to cure for almost any illness, phlebotomy’s most common purpose today is to help doctors diagnose patients through testing. Now a days, the only time it is used as a primary care treatment is limited to rare diseases like hemochromatosis, a metabolism disorder, or polycythemia vera, the increase in blood volume.

 

When did Phlebotomy begin?

Phlebotomy, or “bloodletting,” has been around for quite a while.  Egyptian, Greek and Roman civilizations are some examples of ancient cultures that preformed phlebotomy. It was thought that most medical illnesses could be cured through bloodletting. However, the practice of drawing blood in previous eras was based less on scientific reasoning, and more so on superstitious belief.  A majority of bloodlettings occurred to rid people of their “evil vices” or let out the “demons” that resided inside of them. Phlebotomy eventually made its way over to the United States in the 18th century with the pilgrims. (2)

 

Then Vs. Now

Bloodletting was an extremely dangerous practice that often wound up killing the victim before the disease the phlebotomy was “treating” could. In 1163, the church banned any of the clergymen from preforming the procedure and passed the job onto barbers. It only made sense, since the profession required the artisan to be skilled with a razor. A “normal” blood draining session would stop when the patient informed the vampire that they felt woozy, and would produce one to four pints of blood. On average, the human body has ten pints of blood and loosing this much blood in such a short amount of time, would ultimately prove fatal for the patient. (2)

Today, phlebotomy technicians are required to go through schooling to learn about sterilization, technique and the proper volume of blood to sample for testing or donating. So no more bloodlettings of four pints or till the patient passes out, the limit is capped to approximately one pint every 56-112 days. (3) Thanks to the wondrous advances in science, technology and medicine, we are no longer relying on barbers to draw blood. That is, of course, aside from the occasional nick while shaving.

 

Sources:

  1. Phlebotomy. (n.d.). Retrieved April 13, 2017, from https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/phlebotomy
  2. Phlebotomy. (2015, July 30). Retrieved April 13, 2017, from http://www.surgeryencyclopedia.com/Pa-St/Phlebotomy.html
  3. The Red Cross. (n.d.). Blood Facts and Statistics. Retrieved April 13, 2017, from http://www.redcrossblood.org/learn-about-blood/blood-facts-and-statistics

A Dentist’s Best Friend: Your Role as a Dental Assistant

Posted by on Mar 10, 2017 in Adult Education, Centura College, Dental Assistant, Dental Assisting

In honor of National Dental Assistant’s Recognition Week, we want to thank and appreciate the men and women who service your smile. Behind most dentists, there is a hard working dental assistant. Acting as the Robin to their Batman, the Chewbacca to their Han Solo, or the floss to their toothbrush, a dental assistant’s role is important to dentists’ every day routines.

Oh, that’s very interesting…But what exactly does a dental assistant do?

One can obviously assume that dental assistants work in the dental industry and that, well, they assist. But what do they assist with? How do they contribute in the day to day activities of a dental office? Do they have to preform surgeries? Do they interact directly with patients or only with dentists? If this is the career you are thinking of getting into, it’s important to understand just what a dental assistant does:

The duties of a dental assistant

Just like most job positions, the precise duties of dental assistants varies from one practice to another. Different state regulations, the size of a practice and services offered at the practice are all factors that alter the demands of dental assistant. That being said, these general tasks, as laid out by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, are what to expect when dental assisting;

  • Arranging patient appointments.
  • Keep patient records, including records of dental treatments and of payments.
  • Processing dental X-rays and completing lab tasks under the supervision of a dentist.
  • Ensure that patients are settled in and comfortable in the dental chair.
  • Sterilizing dental instruments.
  • Prep patients and the work area for the dental procedures and treatments that are to be done.
  • Handing instruments to the dentist as they work on a patient.
  • Cleaning up the mouth using a suction hose and other equipment as the dentist performs a procedure.
  • Advising patients on any follow-up care they need to do such as using particular dental products.

Qualities of a good dental assistant

Ok, now that we have gone over the technical aspects of the job, what are the some social qualities expected? Well, a good assistant will have the following skills;

1) Detail orientated in order to follow rules and regulations as pertains to general dental hygiene and in helping a dentist carry out specific procedures.

2) Dexterity which means an ability to work with the hands. This is important because dental work is done on a particular tooth with precision tools and instruments.

3) Interpersonal skills to be able to work well with patients and dentists. For instance, a good assistant will be able to calm down a stressed or scared patient.

4) Listening skills to be able to listen to patients and the dentist, understand what they need and give it to them. Listening skills are also important to be able to learn the right way to carry out tasks like dental X-rays and tests.

5) Organizational skills to be able to put everything in order for the dentist and also to be able to maintain accurate patient records.

 

Job outlook for dental assistants

Now that we’ve covered the technical and social prospects of the job, let’s check out what the forecast is in the demand for dental assistants; According to the Bureau of Labor statistics, prospects are good. It is expected that employment will grow by 18% between 2014 through 2024. 1 This is attributed to research findings that are increasing the demand for preventive dental services. Growth will also be enabled by more people having access to health insurance. Having cover for dental care will have more people seeing their dentist.

So there you have it. A dental assistant, in the very least, is the dentist’s go-to for tasks including lab work, record keeping and instrument sterilization, while they act as a dental specific version of Jiminy Cricket, supplying patients with instructions on how to care for their teeth and comfort by listening to patient needs.

To learn about Centura’s Dental Assistant Diploma program, visit http://centuracollege.edu/college-programs/health-science/dental-assisting/index.html.

1 https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/mobile/dental-assistants.htm

Suit Up: Centura Style

Posted by on Feb 15, 2017 in Adult Education

Centura College Virginia Beach Fashion Show

Dressing for the Interview:

Centura College’s Virginia Beach Campus held a “Get ‘Suited’ for the Right Career Fashion Show” on Tuesday, November 15, 2016. The event provided all students with a first-look at professional attire to wear to interviews within various industries. Participants modeled acceptable and unacceptable attire to wear to job interviews, externships, work, and college.

 

Before each job interview, hopeful candidates must decide what to wear. This is a big decision as one wants to make a positive, lasting impression within the first 30 seconds of meeting a potential future employer. The fashion show was a fun, unique way for Centura students to bring to life the ‘Do’s and Don’ts’ of what to wear for an interview through role-play.

 

And where does Centura Virginia Beach find all of these stylish tips and tricks, one might ask? Fashionista and Career Services Coordinator, Damika Howard-Wayne. In addition to acting as the campus’s professional work attire stylist, Ms. Howard-Wayne coaches our students and graduates through mock interviews and assists with resume and cover letter writing.

 

The event was a success that created an awareness of how to dress appropriate for interviews within Centura’s different fields of study: Business, management, information technology and medical assisting, just to name a few. The fashion show concluded with Ms. Howard-Wayne providing feedback to the group as to why outfits were and weren’t acceptable interview outfits.

 

Thank you to the staff and students who attended the fashion show and especially those students who participated. From the Information Technology Specialist Program, those students included:  Marcus Barrett, Melissa Warden, Santana Crump, Lakeasha Hill, Caitlin Loughner, and Rachqel Ricks. The students of the Business Program consisted of Mayowa Afolabi, Emily Griffin, Tamara Harvey, Alexander-Ireland, Kerry Kavula, Lena Pagan-Mohr, and William Prince. From the Medical Assisting Programs, the students included:  Debra Brackett, Jewel Hall, Paulette Perkins, and Allison Wells.

 

Pictured (Left-to-Right):  Kerry Kavula; Debra Brackett; Allison Wells, Ms. Damika Howard-Wayne, Career Services Coordinator; Tamara Harvey, Paulette Perkins, and Jewel Hall.

Centura Virginia Beach Prepares Students for Job Interviews

Written by Jeff Barbour, Edited by Jul DeGeus

 

Newport News Celebrates First Phlebotomy Graduates

Posted by on May 18, 2016 in Adult Education, Centura College, Medical Assisting, Phlebotomy

CPEN_Phlebotomy_Grads

On December 7th, 2015, the Peninsula campus launched their first phlebotomy course. A six week course fast paced, with a load of information. Everyone was excited. The phlebotomy students endured the rigorous course, persevered, and finally completed the main objective, which was to pass their certification. When test time came, everyone was nervous and anxious. They closed their eyes while the computer tallied their scores, and upon opening their eyes to view their scores, everyone was filled with delight, as they all had passed. They rejoiced as if they had won the Super Bowl! It may not have been the Super Bowl but this was a memorable time that made them all feel like winners. They can all proudly say, “I am a Certified Phlebotomist Technician”. Here at CPEN, we are all proud of their accomplishment.

You might be asking,

So what does a Phlebotomy graduate do?

Few people probably know the term phlebotomist, but it’s the health care professional who draws blood and ensures the proper amount is taken and that all blood is properly labeled and stored. Whether you have been a patient or a blood donor, you have seen a phlebotomist. Anyone who chooses this field has to be comfortable with blood, needles, databases, test tubes and blood vials. You will draw blood, verify the patient’s or blood donor’s identity, label the blood and enter patient information into a database. You’ll assemble and maintain equipment as well to prevent infections or other complications. Phlebotomists also tend to reassure nervous patients who don’t like needles, and some of them will explain what they are doing for patients who are interested.

Phlebotomy technicians are becoming very high in demand, and that oppertunity is increasingly steadily. This is partly because of locations (such as hospitals which are open 24 hours) require three shifts of phlebotomists on staff. That means that if you are flexible about the hours you work, you will probably find even more opportunity in this field.

 

Click here to start your Career in Phlebotomy today!

 

<