Centura College

Connecting Communities & Careers

What is the Difference Between Web Development and Information Technology?

Posted by on Oct 17, 2017 in Adult Education, Centura Chesapeake, Centura College, Centura Newport News, Centura Virginia Beach, Computer Network Management, Computer Networking

The world of digital technology can be confusing. Many organizations fail to understand the clear distinction between various platforms within the digital technology. Do you need an IT specialist, a web developer, or a website designer? And who does what exactly? Digital service providers have a different set of skills and areas of expertise.

This is how it works: you don’t take your car to a collision shop when you want it detailed, or to a tire store when you want the oil changed. The same thing applies to information technology and web development. We are going to dissect the distinction between web development and information technology to help clear confusion and help you better communicate about the different roles.

What is Information Technology?

Information Technology (IT) has to do with the implementation and maintenance of your organization’s computer network. An IT specialist is the person handles the company’s software, hardware, email systems and security systems.

In the Web Industry scope, IT encompasses storage, transfer, reception and manipulation of data using computer networks. It may not be clear at a first glance, but IT represents the technology behind the standardization and coordination of the organization’s information.

What is Web Development?

Web development refers to the creation and development of websites and hosting them on the internet or intranet. This should never be confused with web design, which typically focuses on the aesthetics of websites. To draw a clear distinction, web designers create designs for a website before it comes alive, while a web developer will utilize the design to carry out the actual coding of the website, bringing the ideas to life.

Web developers work on anything as simple as plain text pages, to more complex social networking sites like Twitter or Facebook. During the development, the web developer engages the web designer and the client through critical thinking, planning, and discussion.

If you look at it from the technical perspective, a web developer builds the functionalities of the website, or simply making the website to perform the tasks you want it to perform. An experienced web developer will integrate various coding languages like CSS, HTML, jQuery, JavaScript, and any other digital technologies to bring out the desired outcome.

The Comparison Between IT Administrator and Web Developer

You can now see that these two fields are totally different, but the case may not be immediately clear when you first walk into a web company’s office. Here’s an analysis of the job description for an IT Administrator and a Web Developer:

IT Administrator

An IT Administrator’s roles and duties include:

  • Configuring computer networks in the organization for easy communication among the coworkers.
  • Setting up and managing existing network infrastructures in the organization and ensuring a seamless flow of data and consistent internet connection.
  • Managing all software and hardware used by the organization and keeping all the software licenses up to date.
  • Managing software and hardware purchasing.
  • Proper keeping of organizations data and information with backups.
  • Troubleshooting any computer hardware failures of the organization.

Web Developer

The Web Developer’s duties and responsibilities include:

  • Developing websites using the most prominent coding languages and technologies.
  • Fixing bugs on the existing websites.
  • Interacting with clients to clearly understand their goals and needs.
  • Maintaining websites.
  • Collaborating with web designers to bring their concepts into reality.
  • Handling domain names and hosting configurations.
  • Creating technical documentations that accompany websites.

It’s pretty clear now that the two jobs have very little similarities. Training in each area is needed to be successful in either role and being able to explain the difference to companies will make sure you exceed employer expectations in a more defined success plan.

Family-Friendly Fall Festival to be Held at Centura College’s Newport News Campus

Posted by on Oct 14, 2017 in Adult Education, Campus Connections, Centura College, Centura Newport News, Press Release, Spotlight Feature

The Newport News campus of Centura College will be hosting its 5th annual Fall Festival on the 21st of October. Event will feature a variety of seasonal activities for the whole family, including a trunk or treat.

By Brian Stauss

Centura College will be holding its 5th annual Fall Festival on Saturday, October 21, at its campus located at 616 Denbigh Blvd., Newport News, VA. The festivities begin at 10 a.m. and will continue until 2 p.m.

This family-friendly event will feature music, refreshments, games for all ages, seasonal arts and crafts, a haunted house, as well as a trunk or treat for children.  Complementary chair massages and medical vital checks will also be available for attendees.

“The local community is the lifeblood of Centura College,” says Greg Daniel, Campus Executive Director at Centura College’s Newport News campus. “Our Fall Festival is an opportunity for us to open our doors to the community and have folks come see what Centura has to offer, all in a relaxed, fun, and family-friendly atmosphere.”

This event is free and open to the public.  For more information, contact Centura College’s Newport News campus at (757) 874-2121 or go to the event page on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/events/120668051926682.

About Centura College

Centura College has been part of an organization dedicated to helping men and women develop careers since 1969. By training working adults in healthcare, technology, business, legal studies and trades, they connect communities with some of the fastest growing career fields in today’s marketplace. The school offers professional facilities, knowledgeable instructors, day or evening classes, job placement assistance and is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC). To learn more, visit www.CenturaCollege.edu or like them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/centura.edu.

Centura Showcase: Massage Therapy

Posted by on Oct 3, 2017 in Adult Education, Centura Chesapeake, Health, Massage Therapy, Press Release

The Chesapeake campus of Centura College will be showcasing its massage therapy program for individuals interested in pursuing a career in the health and wellness field. The event will offer interactive demonstrations of a variety of massage techniques.

By Brian Stauss

Centura College will be showcasing its massage therapy program on Wednesday, October 11, at its campus located at 932 Ventures Way, Chesapeake, VA. The demo begins at 6 p.m. and will continue until 8 p.m.

The event will feature hands-on demonstrations of reflexology, chair massage, deep tissue massage and aromatherapy. This interactive event is designed to provide participants with a real-world view of what it would be like to work in the massage therapy career field.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for individuals considering a career in the health and wellness field,” says Shawnte Peterson, Massage Therapy Program Coordinator at Centura College’s Chesapeake campus. “I can’t think of a better way to see if a career is right for you than by getting a hands-on preview into your field of interest.”

Participants are also invited to take a tour of the campus’s training facilities and to meet with admissions staff about the benefits of career-focused training provided at Centura College.

This event is free and open to the public.  For more information, contact the Chesapeake campus at (757) 549-2121.

About Centura College

Centura College has been part of an organization dedicated to helping men and women develop careers since 1969. By training working adults in healthcare, technology, business, legal studies and trades, they connect communities with some of the fastest growing career fields in today’s marketplace. The school offers professional facilities, knowledgeable instructors, day or evening classes, job placement assistance and is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC). To learn more, visit www.CenturaCollege.edu or like them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/centura.edu.

On the Record: A Look at a Career in Health Information Technology

Posted by on Sep 7, 2017 in Adult Education, Centura Chesapeake, Health Information Technology, Spotlight Feature

By Jul DeGeus

“Let me check your records.” A phrase many of us hear when visiting the doctor’s office. But who manages these records? Who makes sure that our medical information is up to date and accurate?

That is part of the job of a Health Information Technician. We sat down with Amanda Carter, Centura College’s Health Information Technology Coordinator for the Chesapeake campus, to find out a little bit more about what it means to be a Health Information Technician:

What made you decide to become a Health Information Technician?

I decided to become a Health Information Technician after I worked in the medical field as a medical assistant for about two years. The job market was constantly changing, so I decided to branch out. It made sense for me to do it because the health care industry was growing larger. Gaining more experience opened up additional opportunities for me to advance my career and to educate people about the ever changing costs of health care.

What advice would you give those considering a career in Health Information Technology?

The advice that I would give those considering a career in Health Information Technology is that even though you don’t have a lot of ‘facetime’ with patients, you are truly making a positive difference in their lives. Health care costs and expenses can be one of the most stressful triggers for patients and their families. As a Health Information Technician you get the chance to help alleviate that stress.

What study aids did you use during your education?

It’s cliché, but my training reinforced that practice makes perfect. I constantly coded scenarios and corrected error reports just to try and trick myself. It helped me to be confident and also taught me to fix interesting and dynamic health care scenarios. It reassured me and gave me positive outlook for my career in the health care field.

What is your proudest moment as a Health Information Technician?

My proudest moment as a Health Information Technician was when I helped an elderly lady with her husband’s seemingly never-ending health care expenses. She was constantly confused and overwhelmed by her billing statements. I knew she needed help understanding them and I offered to explain them to her in a way that made sense. After I took the time to go over them with her, you could hear the excitement in her voice; she finally fully knew what was going on with her bills and was ecstatic. Just hearing her excitement over the phone gave me so much joy. As if that wasn’t enough, she even made it a point visit the office just to thank me in person with homemade chocolate chip cookies.  It was the BEST DAY EVER!

Information Technology: Keeping Your Information Safe

Posted by on Aug 2, 2017 in Bachelor Degree Completion Program, Centura College

By Robb Rajnys and Jul DeGeus

With great technological advances, comes great technological responsibilities; like protecting your personal information.

Thanks to the progress of technology, we are living in an age where you can accomplish almost anything with a swipe of a finger. Track your fitness, manage your bank account or even supervise your lights and lock systems at your home remotely; that is, as long as you have a Wi-Fi connection and a charged smart phone. But like all great things, technology comes with a downfall: cyberattacks.

Understanding Cyberattacks

There severity of a cyberattack is only limited to the imagination of the person who creates the virus. Familiarize yourself with common terms and proactive prevention to ensure the safety of your personal information:

Malware: In Latin, “mal” means “bad,” it’s no surprise that malware is the general term for malicious threats, like Trojans or worms, that try to steal and destroy data.

Malvertising: Keeping in mind that the Latin root of “malware”, malvertising is an ad that has been infected with malware. When you click on the ad, whatever was effect the cyberattacker loaded in the coding of the ad is downloaded on your computer.

Password Attacks: Probably the most obviously attack term, password attacks occur when a hacker tries to steal your password for information. Cyber thieves can use a program to access your passwords, or even resort to old fashioned ways: peering over your shoulder to see your smart phone screen as you type in the pin to your debit card.

Phishing: Another term many people are familiar with is “phishing.” This attack targets your email accounts. The attacker sets up a company and requests personal information or provides a link to click on. The website’s information you’re directed to aligns with the information you received in the email, sometimes creating a false sense of security and legitimacy. As soon as you input your information, the hackers can use it as they see fit.

Ransomware: In a nut shell, Ransomware is a virus that will lock you out of all your data- documents, photos, contacts, etc. – until you pay a fee. If you chose not to pay the fee, you’ll have to wipe your whole computer in order to use it, losing all of your data anyway.

Thwarting the Attacks

Never fear, prevention is out there! To counter the above hazards, ensure you install and adhere to the following:

Firewalls: This is a virtual gate, if you will, that can prevent or allow certain traffic from leaving or gaining access to your PC. To increase effectiveness, the firewall should stay turned on, especially if you are connected to the internet.

Antivirus Software with Ransomware Protection: Invest in a good antivirus software that includes a ransomware protection plan; good meaning that you should pay for it. Most free antivirus protection software only monitors issues and then alert you, not take care of the problem. Purchasing antivirus software provides monitoring and proactive protection.

Keep Your PC Up to Date: Most users do not maintain their updates. Updates are important because they’re purpose is to help keep your computer safe.  Every time a new malware is developed or and old one is updated, programmers hastily work to develop and push out an update to their consumers to counteract its effects, keeping your information all the more protected.

Email: Everyone on the planet has an email now a days. 91% of cyberattacks stem from email. Be wary of emails you receive that:

  • Request passwords
  • Request your Social Security Number
  • Offer anything “free”
  • Alert you with an “urgent” warning or threat of an expiration of an account
  • Request credit card information

Everywhere you go on the internet leaves “footprints;” where you shop, where you bank, what you may want to buy, etc. Malware picks up on your “footprints” and tries to trick you by creating emails and pop-up advertisements that are catered to your internet browsing, searching and buying habits. If something look suspect, treat it as such. However, if you land on a website you’re not so sure about or regret downloading a file, there are handy websites to scan files or sites in question.

File Storage: Backup your computer and all data regularly to ensure its safety. Use a secure file housing website, software, or simply copy important folders and files to a USB disk regularly. This minimizes the impact, headaches and helps to avoid having pay a ransomware to get your vital documents.

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