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Massage Therapy Jobs: How to Get One!

Posted by on Aug 25, 2014 in Massage Therapy

Massage Therapy Jobs: How to Get One!

Massage Therapy Jobs: How To Get One | Centura College

The good news for massage therapy jobs is that the field is growing. From 2012 to 2022, employment in massage therapy is projected to grow 23%. This is faster than average for all other occupations and creates new opportunities for newly-certified massage therapists.

However, securing one of these jobs is still very competitive.  The American Massage Therapy Association estimates that there are 300,000 to 340,000 massage therapists in the United States, including students.  Getting one of these new jobs will depend on job seekers securing the right qualifications, understanding the market, and knowing the best match for their circumstances.

Ensure Proper Accreditation

Not only does a massage therapy require proper training but national and local certifications are often required. After completing graduation requirements, check states and municipalities for massage therapist licensing requirements. This may mean taking more than one standardized exam.

Most states will require the national exam in addition to any local requirements. Research these to ensure compliance.

Draft a Good Resume

Resumes for massage therapy jobs require name, work history, achievements, certifications, and elements that make the job seeker a good fit at a minimum. Being specific for a job is also helpful to employers. For example, if the desired job is in a sports medicine clinic, include any athletic background or interest along with job history. Showing interest and passion in a particular area will help with consideration.

As a student, emphasize education and certifications, along with internships and volunteer work. Be willing to perform a trial massage to show skills.

Investigate Work Environment

Massage therapists may work in exclusive medical massage practices, hospitals, health clubs, hotels, cruise ships, or maintain home offices. Understand these settings and expectations for massage therapists in each environment. Each will have their own unique qualities and different demands. Showing this understanding in an interview or inquiry will add credibility to an application.

This investigation will also help determine if the setting is a good match. In an occupation that involves caring for others, being in the wrong environment can limit both job satisfaction and career options.

Define the Good Job Match

69% of massage therapists are sole practitioners with their own offices. Rather than straight-up employee/employer relationships many also work as sub-contractors, which will carry the same responsibilities of being self-employed, including paying health insurance premium and taxes. Are these requirements tolerable? Or is steady W-2 employment needed?

This involves knowing acceptable job terms before searching and accepting. Know how much income is required to live each month and how much responsibility can be managed in terms of business expenses, taxes, and even paying space rent in addition to personal expenses. If working as a sub-contractor, attracting clientele will also be part of the duties, meaning marketing is also within the job description.

Being an employee for an established practice may be the best option, especially for a recent graduate, but statistics show few find this option. It may be a good idea to research self-employment and independent contracting in case a position that is ideal on many fronts also contains elements that require consideration for taxes, marketing, and other issues faced by a freelancer.

Expect “Trade Tests”

A “trade test” involves a job seeker providing a massage for a manager or a client while another observes. It is good practice and students with less work background can benefit with this opportunity to show skill and talent. Having this opportunity moves the student to an equal level with applicants with more extensive work backgrounds.

However, while this is expected, make sure the potential employer does not take advantage of this arrangement. One “trade test” is reasonable but a request to massage many clients without payment is simply forced volunteer work that is unlikely to lead to employment.

Research Potential Employers or Contractors

If considering an application to work for a clinic, spa, or other setting, learn about them by visiting as a client. Receive a massage to assess skills, company values, and culture. That will give an advantage if the process moves to an interview and trade test. This will also help to see if this is a good environment to work in.

Just as with any job search, finding a massage therapist position requires knowledge and perseverance. With the continued job growth, options are only expanding making finding an ideal position quite possible for new graduates in massage therapist. Understanding the market, being flexible with opportunities, and knowing personal requirements will help secure the best massage therapist job matching both skills and circumstances.

Contact us for more information about massage therapy training or to speak with an admissions representative and apply for admission, contact Centura College today by visiting our Website.  You can also learn more about Centura College at our Consumer Information Disclosure page, Your right to know.

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